Getting water to the home is one thing, making sure that it is safe to drink and to use for cooking, washing and domestic purposes is quite another.  The advantage of groundwater sources is that the water often needs little or no treatment to be safe - however, it can get contaminated. The two main intervention treatment options are:

  • Household Water Treatment
  • Centralised Water Treatment for piped systems.

Water treatment should not been looked at on its own - because it adds costs, complexity and another thing to go wrong, it is often best avoided. Therefore, the starting point should be Water Safety Planning:

Household water treatment is closely associated with the RWSN theme 'Accelerating Self Supply', however, it has its own network because this topic is so complex:

  • International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage

Other good resources include:


Related Resources

Proceedings of the 7th RWSN Forum

29 Nov - 2 Dec 2016, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire

The 2016 Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Abidjan was the first global gathering to consider the practical challenge of how everyone worldwide can get access to safe, affordable water by 2030. It was also the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country, in the 25 years since the creation of the network.
The Forum gathered 467 rural water sector practitioners from over 300 organisations from 64 countries in Africa, Asia, Americas, and Europe, in a bilingual (English/French) four day event. It was opened by the Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. We were joined by HE State Minster James Dengchol Tot, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Electricity of Ethiopia, as well as a delegation from AMCOW.

This Forum proceedings compiles all peer-reviewed materials. Separate downloads and links to the films can be found at: https://rwsn7.net/content/ | »

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Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group

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The document is designed for Rotarians with basic levels of understanding of water issues, yet it will lead the reader to advanced levels of system design and operation.



DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred. | »

Effectiveness of In-Line Chlorination of Gravity Flow Water Supply in Two Rural Communities in Panama

MSc Thesis Academic Year 2010/11

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred. | »

Water Safety Planning for Small Communities

Step-by-step risk management guidance for drinking-water supplies in small communities

The WSP approach is designed to help a community manage health risks that could threaten its water supply. By following the WSP approach, community members identify and prioritize health risks and, where necessary, take steps, over time,to improve the safety of the water supply using available resources. WSPs are applicable for a range of scales and levels, and in different contexts. A WSP can be developed for all existing schemes, from point sources to piped systems, as well as for new supplies. In new schemes, it should be straightforward for the supporting agency to incorporate the WSP approach into initial community mobilization and project implementation.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred. | »

Technologies applied for drinking water treatment in rural communities

The application of drip chlorination, tablet chlorinators, solar disinfection technology and ceramic filter in Honduras

This report documents some of the most appropriate technologies and methodologies for drinking water disinfection used by rural communities and families in Honduras, and presents the challenges they face in securing sustainable access to safe water.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred. | »